5 Comments

  1. Yes I agree it’s as ‘dark as any noir,’ a fully expected conclusion in view of the clarification, well-established here: “These films represent what has been termed ‘poetic realism’, a gritty fatalistic French cycle of films seen as a precursor of the classic film noir cycle, with a male protagonist failing dismally to escape a dark past with a doomed romantic entanglement.”

    Arletty is excellent, and as you right note, there is a beautiful score here by Maurice Jaubert. I always found it amazing that this film was shot on sets, rather than on-location. Of course, again as you declare, Trauner is a wizard, with his spectacular work on display in CHILDREN OF PARADISE. It couldn’t have been more convincing that what we have here. Like the other two films of this “trilogy” this film is a treasure of world cinema.

  2. DeeDee

    Hi! Tony,
    I read this post when you first posted, (Because I don’t comment don’t mean I’am not reading your post…Translation:“Lurker”)but since I never watched this film, nor have I watched Le quai des brumes (Port of Shadows 1938) and Le jour se lève (Daybreak 1939).

    I decided not to leave a comment, but while rereading your post…I will add all three to my ClassicFlix queue…Therefore, I will be sure to watch these trilogy of French films that you have pointed out as: “Films that represent what has been termed ‘poetic realism’, a gritty fatalistic French cycle of films seen as a precursor of the classic film noir cycle, with a male protagonist failing dismally to escape a dark past with a doomed romantic entanglement.”

    By the way, the poster for this film is great…being a collector of film noir memorabilia…I will try to find out how much this poster is going for on the open market.

    Once again, thanks for sharing!
    DeeDee ;)

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