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New York: Scenes from The Window (1949) Then and Now

The Window (1949) was filmed on the streets of New York, and challenges Jule’s Dassin’s The Naked City (1948) as the first documentary-style noir. The Window was actually completed two months before The Naked City in January 1948.

Noir aficionado and film-maker Ray Ottulich visited New York recently, and he has kindly allowed me to publish his photographs of locales used in The Window matched to actual frames from the movie. This is the second post featuring locale shots from Ray. The first in October last year featured Robert Wise’s classic film noir Odds Against Tomorrow, which was shot on location in New York City and in the Hudson river town of Hudson, NY.

E105th street 1949 2013 New York: Scenes from The Window (1949) Then and Now

East 105th Street

TW PAV New York: Scenes from The Window (1949) Then and Now

East 105th Street

TW19thPrecinct New York: Scenes from The Window (1949) Then and Now

19th Precinct East 67th Street

TWDSC08401 New York: Scenes from The Window (1949) Then and Now

East River Bakery

TW comp Park Ave Viaduct 1949 2013 New York: Scenes from The Window (1949) Then and Now

East 105th Street & Park Ave Viaduct

 

 

 

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Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

The modern metropolis cannot be imagined without the automobile. Along with the skyscraper, teeming streets of humanity, and barely functioning decrepit mass transit, the automobile defines the noir city. Dark deeds, heists, police pursuits, escapes, betrayals, and death all happen in and around cars – the darker and wetter the streets the better to deliver justice or not. Wailing sirens, screeching tyres, and the crack of gunshots from and into car windows mark out the celestial territory of film noir.

thekillers0029 Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

behind green lights Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

bodyguard1948 train Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

bigcombo0547 Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

TheCrookedWay1949 13 Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

Slaughteron10thAvenue 11 Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

side street 1950 15h34m02s49 Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

side street 1950 15h33m53s251 Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

peopleagainstohara 13 Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

peopleagainstohara 9 Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

peopleagainstohara 8 Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

oddsagainsttomorrow Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

noraprentiss1947 Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

NoMan ofHerOwn00008 Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

NoMan ofHerOwn00006 Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

kiss me deadly Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

Image00003 Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

highwill1946 18h56m05s222 Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

electricnightmare Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

detour1945 Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

crimsonkimono050 Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

crimewave585 Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

BornToKill Taxi Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

borderincindent Film Noir Motifs: The Automobile

Articles, Frames Gallery, Lobby

“All you need to make a movie is a girl and a gun”

The famous pensée of Jean-Luc Godard about girls, guns, and movies is perhaps too glib, and in film noir, not really the case. While in classic noir, we certainly had women and guns, femme-fatales were more likely to be closer to 30 than 20 in years, and rarely held a gun let alone shoot one. A femme-fatale was usually adept at having a love-struck sap do the shooting for her.

Though there were occasions when a dame pulled a gun and used it.

Mildred Pierce 638 530 All you need to make a movie is a girl and a gun

Mildred Pierce (1945)

ssmurder5 All you need to make a movie is a girl and a gun

Murder My Sweet (1944)

protectedimage All you need to make a movie is a girl and a gun

Blues in the Night (1941)

ladyshanghai All you need to make a movie is a girl and a gun

The Lady from Shanghai (1947)

killerbait All you need to make a movie is a girl and a gun

Too Late for Tears (1949)

Jane Greer Out of the Past 1947 All you need to make a movie is a girl and a gun

Out of the Past (1947)

Repeat Performance All you need to make a movie is a girl and a gun

Repeat Performance (1947)

Gun Crazy 1 All you need to make a movie is a girl and a gun

Gun Crazy (1950)

Deception00009 All you need to make a movie is a girl and a gun

Deception (1946)

 

Articles, Frames Gallery, Lobby, Noir Cities

Hudson, NY: Scenes from Odds Against Tomorrow Then and Now

OddsAgainstTomorrowBegleyatBank Hudson, NY: Scenes from Odds Against Tomorrow Then and Now

Robert Wise’s classic film noir Odds Against Tomorrow - see my review here - was shot on location in New York City and in the Hudson river town of  Hudson, NY. Noir aficionado and film-maker Ray Ottulich visited Hudson this month and has kindly allowed me to publish his photographs of locales used in Odds Against Tomorrow matched to actual frames from the movie. I have taken some liberties with the montages to present them here, cropping and super-imposing shots to hopefully make the comparisons more dynamic.  Ray’s creative talent and invaluable contribution to film noir history is to be applauded.  After all, as the years roll on, the odds are against these locales remaining as they are. Great work Ray!

Hudson is where the heist, which is the dramatic focus of the movie, takes place, and a fair amount of screen time is spent observing the central characters as they wait out the day of the heist which goes down that night.

OddsAgainstTomorrowBusStop Hudson, NY: Scenes from Odds Against Tomorrow Then and Now

OddsAgainstTomorrowBegleyAndStatue Hudson, NY: Scenes from Odds Against Tomorrow Then and Now

OddsAgainstTomorrowWaterfront Hudson, NY: Scenes from Odds Against Tomorrow Then and Now

OddsAgainstTomorrowBegleyAtFence Hudson, NY: Scenes from Odds Against Tomorrow Then and Now

OddsAgainstTomorrowFirstNationalBank Hudson, NY: Scenes from Odds Against Tomorrow Then and Now

OddsAgainstTomorrowWarrenStreet Hudson, NY: Scenes from Odds Against Tomorrow Then and Now

 

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The Thin Man (1934): James Wong Howe’s Noir Counterpoint

TheThinMan 1934 3 The Thin Man (1934):  James Wong Howe’s Noir Counterpoint

When director W.S. Van Dyke commissioned a screenplay from Dashiell Hammett’s last novel, The Thin Man, a throw-away story about a retired gumshoe drawn back into the business to investigate a series of murders in NYC, he asked for a comic script.  He got an enjoyable if innocuous screwball comedy playing on the dick, Nick Charles, being married to a wealthy dame, both of them being lushes, and having an eccentric mutt.

The casting is perfect with William Powell as Nick and the saucy Myrna Loy playing Nora his better-half.  The mutt is played by a wire fox terrier called Asta – think ‘Eddie’ from TV’s Frasier. A frothy mix of mystery, sleuthing, and wry banter delivers a diverting movie which has you smiling if not laughing.

“it is the darkly lit mystery scenes set-up by Howe that impress cinematically”
DP James Wong Howe is integral to sustaining interest. While the comic antics are fun and add spritz to a weak story, and true both leads are delightful, it is the darkly lit mystery scenes set-up by Howe that impress cinematically. It is of course hard to delineate where the DP’s contribution starts and ends, though I would venture to say that with a less talented DP I doubt there would have been the same fluid camera work and darkly expressionist counterpoint that sustains the narrative.

Some  additional frames from the movie to support my case:

TheThinMan 1934 4 The Thin Man (1934):  James Wong Howe’s Noir Counterpoint

TheThinMan 1934 5 The Thin Man (1934):  James Wong Howe’s Noir Counterpoint

TheThinMan 1934 1 The Thin Man (1934):  James Wong Howe’s Noir Counterpoint

 

 

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Deception (1946): Expressionist Noir Melodrama

Deception00001 Deception (1946): Expressionist Noir Melodrama

In Irving Rapper’s 1946 dark melodrama Deception (1946) Bette Davis is no longer young and as fiery as in pictures past but she still packs a mean punch.  Her co-star Claude Raines chews up the scenery and dominates as a vain and vindictive lover. Though Bette gets to plug him in the end. Apparently during production Davis was so scared of Raines stealing the picture, she had the ending changed so that she literally put matters to rest. Director Rapper was reported as not being too happy with this change, but to my mind the scenario’s trajectory points to nothing less.

The story revolves around a passionate love triangle with the other co-star Paul Henreid.  Raines has been ‘mentoring’ struggling émigré pianist Davis and things change when her lost lover and cellist Henreid turns up.  These creative types set to it with a vengeance, with Davis establishing her own tragic entrapment by lies and an obsessive distrust of Raines, who plays at the homme-fatale. An impressive modern classical score by Erich Wolfgang Kor is used to wonderful effect.

Deception is a strange film with a metropolitan gothic ambience.  Quite avant-garde for a Hollywood soapie of the period, with inventive low angles and expressionist lighting deftly overcoming set-bound constraints. Amazingly, Davis later admitted that Raines made the picture! The direction is certainly elegant and the collaboration with ace DP Ernest Heller and Art Director Anton Grot produced masterly monochrome visuals ranging from the sumptuous almost decadent elegance of Raines’ palatial home to the stark modernist lines of Davis’ NY loft apartment.  This apartment has the city as a brooding backdrop exposed by a massive window running the length of a wall of the tenement.

A must-see noir melodrama. Check out these other frames from the movie.

Deception00004 Deception (1946): Expressionist Noir Melodrama

Deception00003 Deception (1946): Expressionist Noir Melodrama

Deception00005 Deception (1946): Expressionist Noir Melodrama

Deception00006 Deception (1946): Expressionist Noir Melodrama

Deception00010 Deception (1946): Expressionist Noir Melodrama

Deception00011 Deception (1946): Expressionist Noir Melodrama

Deception00008 Deception (1946): Expressionist Noir Melodrama

Deception00009 Deception (1946): Expressionist Noir Melodrama

 

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The House on 92nd Street (1945): Real Drama with a Solemn Purpose

Image000200 The House on 92nd Street (1945): Real Drama with a Solemn Purpose

Henry Hathaway’s 1945 film The House on 92nd Street for 20th Century Fox was the first of the documentary-noirs that presaged the gritty realism of Jules Dassin’s The Naked City in 1948.

Although the story of the FBI’s breaking-up of a Nazi spy-ring isn’t strictly noir, it has all the elements of the police-procedural that ushered in a shift in the classic noir cycle from the early 1950s: documentary footage with a news-reel feel, stentorian narration, and a rousing musical score. All elements driven towards the portrayal of a great US institution “implacably” committed to the defense of American freedoms and the destruction of internal threats.

Based on a true case, the producer had full access to FBI surveillance footage and to FBI establishments and staff, and the opening scenes feature J. Edgar Hoover working at his desk. Wisely director Hathaway chose to shoot in actual New York City locales, and his DP Norbert Brodine delivered NY in compelling deep focus. Interesting also is the highlighting of then cutting-edge technology used in the pursuit of the spies: including a punch-card reading computer finding a finger-print match, and spectrography enlisted to identify the brand of lipstick found in a suspect’s ashtray. The whole affair balances real drama with a solemn purpose that has you engrossed.

What I found particularly fascinating was the adroit expressionism of the tense finale, which is clearly evident in the following frames from the movie. You sometimes find art in the strangest places.

Image000031 The House on 92nd Street (1945): Real Drama with a Solemn Purpose

Image000041 The House on 92nd Street (1945): Real Drama with a Solemn Purpose

Image000061 The House on 92nd Street (1945): Real Drama with a Solemn Purpose

Image000081 The House on 92nd Street (1945): Real Drama with a Solemn Purpose

Image00009 The House on 92nd Street (1945): Real Drama with a Solemn Purpose

Image00010 The House on 92nd Street (1945): Real Drama with a Solemn Purpose

Image00013 The House on 92nd Street (1945): Real Drama with a Solemn Purpose

Image00015 The House on 92nd Street (1945): Real Drama with a Solemn Purpose